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Posted on: June 25, 2020

Fight the Bite

Preventing Mosquito Bites

  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and pants when out hiking.
  • Keep window and door screens in good repair
  • Empty standing water periodically or use larvicides on large bodies of water
  • Use an EPA approved insect repellent
  • Be careful at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active
Products that work to stop mosquito bites:Products you should avoid:
✔ OFF Deep Woods Insect Repellent✖ Vitamin B1 Skin Patches
✔ Cutter Lemon Eucalyptus Inspect Repellent✖ Citronella Candles
✔ EcoSmart Organic Insect Repellent✖ Bug-Repellent Wristbands/Bracelets
✔ Repel 100 Insect Repellent✖ Ultrasonic Devices
✔ Cutter Skinsations Insect Repellent


West Nile Virus

West Nile virus is a disease that is spread through infected mosquitoes. 

Most people won’t show symptoms of West Nile but in about 20% of infected people symptoms can include:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Body Aches
  • Joint Pains
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Rash

Severe cases happen in 1 in 150 people and symptoms can include:

  • High Fever
  • Muscle Weakness
  • Disorientation
  • Tremors
  • Numbness
  • Paralysis

In severe cases, parients can get encephalitis (swelling of the brain) or meningitis. It is best to prevent bites before they happen to help prevent these serious illnesses.

Did you know?

Certain types of birds can carry West Nile. Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on infected birds, which the mosquitoes can then pass on to humans. 

Periodically checking your property for dead birds can help the Health Department determine if there might be West Nile in your area.

Look for these kinds of birds that are known carriers:

  • American Crow
  • Black-Billed Magpie
  • Blue Jay

For More Information

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -  www.cdc.gov/westnile

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services - http://dhhs.ne.gov/wnv

Panhandle Public Health District - www.pphd.org

Contact Us

Melissa HaasKendra LauruhnPanhandle Public Health District
Environmental Health CoordinatorDisease Surveillance808 Box Butte Ave
308-487-3600 ext. 108308-633-2866 ext. 106Hemingford, NE 69348


Information provided by Panhandle Public Health District

Sources: NE Dept. of Health and Human Services

Rodrigues et al. 2015. The Efficacy of Some Commercially Available

Insect Repellents for Aedes aegypti (Diptera:Cullicidae) and Aedes albopictures (Diptera:Cullicidae). Journal of Insect Science. Vol 15:140.

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